bookmark_borderFriday, week 8 (Oct.16)

Friday, week 8 (Oct.16)

And we made it through another week! Our shiny Covid-Dashboard is also showing how all the Mules on campus are doing a splendid job of sticking to the rules and keeping the community safe. Thank you thank you thank you!!

screenshot of the Covid-19 cases on Muhlenberg campus shows 0 infected and 0 in quarantine on Oct. 14
A second week with no new cases, and nobody in quarantine. Double high five!!

This week, I'll ask you to fill out a brief and fully anonymous survey with just four questions. You already write self-reflections as part of your courses (and thank you for the open and honest reflections!), and you have the Typepads for an anonymous rant any time of the semester, but I think an anonymous google form is sometimes just easier to take stock of what's going on with the course, the semester, and how we can all adjust our sails for the second part of the semester. Keep your eyes peeled, will be delivered via your Muhlenberg email inbox!

Schedule for today

HST137
  • Comments on Hypothes.is were due last night, so you can start looking through them, and look through posts from your peers to gear up for the End of Week reflection , which is due on Sunday night, Oct. 18. (But you can of course submit earlier). Collect your points in the Canvas Declaration Quiz!
HST271
  • In the morning I will add the posts for Week 8 to the randomizer and load that to the webpage, and then you can begin to comment on the blog posts using Hypothes.is (group HST271). Feedback on four blogs, please, and don't forget to collect your points in the Canvas Declaration Quiz.
  • A third Show and Tell project is due next week Friday (Oct. 23), to show off what you learned about the tumultuous and complicated period 1912-1937. Pitch an idea on theCloud Lounge discussion board Cloud Lounge discussion board, and check out some of the options and resources available in the dedicated webpage for the assignment. A couple of movies are options from this module forward; unfortunately you'll have to check if you have access through rentals or film streaming, because I couldn't get them in digital/streamed version on Canvas on time.
HST439 Your blog post for week 8 is due tonight. Take on board the comments and discussion from Hypothes.is group HST439. Don't forget to collect your points in the Canvas Declaration Quiz!

Activities

Study Abroad Information Session

2:00-3:00 PM, on Zoom, sponsored by the Office of Global Education.

Learn more about the study abroad application process at a MANDATORY Meeting session. Attend either one of the two mandatory meeting sessions on Zoom to learn about the steps necessary to apply to study abroad and how to make important decisions about your experience. Join this program on Zoom from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. More Info: michellerifkin@muhlenberg.edu

(Note from Dr. D: I know it's hard to imagine studying abroad while we're still in the current situation but if you're interested, better to hedge your bets and go to the session! If you can at all do a study abroad, I highly recommend it. I'm also more than happy to talk about my personal experiences as a student and scholar in foreign countries.)

Weekend Long Read

Wait? What? Another long read about cheats in biblical scholarship?? It's not that other fields aren't immune, but the high profile cases, a lot of money involved, and a writer at the Atlantic who's interested in this stuff have made for some great investigative reporting and reading!

So. What do you do when suddenly there turns out to be a lost Gospel that talks about Jesus's wife? Too good to be true, or the scoop of the century? Read for yourself:

This is the last of the long reads on this topic. I'll be on the lookout for other great long reads for future weekends, please send me suggestions! If you want to read more about cheats and forgers in the world of scholars and texts, and how the truth did in the end catch up with them (because otherwise, we'd have not found out yet), here are a few other suggestions:

  • Trevor-Roper, H. R. The Hermit of Peking: The Hidden Life of Sir Edmund Backhouse. New York: Knopf, 1977.
    • Or how the Bodleian library in Oxford, the British government during WWI, and several journalists burnt their fingers and lost quite a bit of money and some reputation in their dealings with the charming and seeminly harmless gentleman Edmund Backhouse.
  • Dietl, Helmut, and Ulrich Limmer. Schtonk: Eine Filmkomödie. Originalausged. Diogenes Taschenbuch, 22481. Zürich: Diogenes, 1992.
    • OK, try to get this with subtitles obviously. It's a weird German comedy about the (fake) Hitler diaries. Incidentally, they were initially authenticated by Hugh Trevor-Roper, author of the book above (he did change his verdict later). Read more about the background in this article in the Independent
  • Grafton, Anthony. Forgers and Critics: Creativity and Duplicity in Western Scholarship. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2019 (first ed. 1990).
    • Prof. Grafton writers extremely well and his scholarship is top-notch, so even though I haven't had a chance to read this book yet, I have no hesitation in recommending it, and I can't wait to settle down with this during the winter break!

"Lesen Sie, Read Me, Illustrated newspaper (1900)" by Susanlenox is licensed under CC PDM 1.0

bookmark_borderThursday, week 8 (Oct. 15)

Today is Thursday of week 8 (Oct. 15).

Erm. That's it. I don't have any special news. Let's just keep trucking along!

Schedule for today

Drop-in tutorials

Drop in tutorial: 11am-12pm, open to all.

  • Option 1: reserve a spot on this Google appointment page
  • Option 2: "drop in" anytime, but you may have to wait a bit in the waiting room.

Both are for a Zoom meeting, using the Green Link on your respective Canvas SECRETS pages (or find the info in your Canvas Calendar).

HST137
  • Get your Discussion Comments in before 11.59pm tonight, and don't forget to collect your points by filling out the Declaration Quiz on Canvas. Everything you need to know is available on that link: how to comment, and four blogs randomly loaded from our fine selection of student posts.
  • Check out the Extra Credit tasks if you feel like picking up a few points.
HST271
  • Get your Weekly Blog Post in by 11.59pm tonight, and collect your points by filling out the Declaration Quiz. Everything you need to know is at that link.
  • Check out the Extra Credit tasks if you feel like picking up a few points.
  • Unbelievable, but we're closing this week another big module of our Search for Modern China, so you can start thinking about how you'd like to demonstrate what you learned about the time period 1912 - 1937 (content week 6, 7, 8) for the third Show and Tell project. Feedback on project 2 will come soon.
  • Check out and provide feedback on the second Show and Tell projects, now up on the Week 8 schedule with a randomizer (I mean... how else?). Be a good sport and help your colleagues!
HST439
  • As always you can continue the annotations of the texts and discussion with your classmates, but you can start thinking about your Weekly Blog Post, which is due on Friday.
  • Check out the Extra Credit tasks if you feel like picking up a few points.

Event: "Genocidal Medicine"

7-8.30pm, Please pre-register for this event by 4pm

Africana Studies and Office for Multicultural Life present the second event in their Fall 20 mini series "From the Ashes", "Genocidal Medicine: Black American Communities, Covid-19, and the Death Toll of Healthcare’s Systemic Anti-Blackness". Check out more details on the poster.

Fun stuff: Dog Philosopher

Tom Gauld on twitter

bookmark_borderWednesday, week 8 (Oct. 14)

Today is Wednesday of week 8, Oct. 14.

A tiny dust storm has kicked up in the twitter-sphere about "teaching modern Chinese history", and I'd like to hear what you think about these two pieces. Maybe if you're in HST137 it's not quite applicable yet, but we will talk more about modern Chinese history and then some of these ideas will come into play.

The opening shot came from James Millward, Professor of History at Georgetown University:

(It's also a rather savage book review, although admittedly it takes aim at an entire industry and not an individual. If you'd like to read other savage book reviews, let me know. Sometimes they're so gentlemanly you don't even realize that's what's going on until a few pages in 👀 )

The response from Pamela Crossley, a Qing historian, is striking: who is the "We" addressed by Millward? Professor Crossley is one of the pioneers in creating a new approach to the study of the Qing, and she feels certainly not included in that list of people making those errors. I had similar questions about Millward's piece: my own research is in a much earlier time period, but is similarly trying to do things in a different way, and questioning some of the big narratives we inherited. I don't know if I am successful in bringing that across in modern Chinese history, which is not my field of research:

I am now also considering chucking Spence's text in favor of her Wobbling Pivot as a recommended textbook next semester for a re-run of HST271. Thoughts on this are welcome!

"Books" by Kim Siever is licensed under CC PDM 1.0

Schedule for today

Drop-in tutorials

Drop in tutorial: 1-2 pm, open to all.

  • Option 1: reserve a spot on this Google appointment page
  • Option 2: "drop in" anytime, but you may have to wait a bit in the waiting room.

Both are for a Zoom meeting, using the Green Link on your respective Canvas SECRETS pages (or find the info in your Canvas Calendar).

HST137
  • In the morning I will add the initial blog posts to the randomizer and load that to the webpage, so you can start on the Discussion Comments.Comments on due by Thursday night.
  • Optional video conference chat/check in at 11.30am: if you want to talk about the course materials or assignments, or about anything related to Chinese history, please come! "Pink Link" can be found on the SECRETS page on Canvas or in the Canvas Calendar for the course.
HST271
HST439 Comments for the Social Annotation are due tonight, 11.59pm in the Hypothes.is group HST439.

Heads-up! Event on Thursday

Thursday, October 15th, from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m: Please pre-register for this event.

Africana Studies and Office for Multicultural Life present the second event in their Fall 20 mini series "From the Ashes": "Genocidal Medicine: Black American Communities, Covid-19, and the Death Toll of Healthcare’s Systemic Anti-Blackness". Check out more details on the poster.

History Club

5 - 6 pm: History Club meets on Zoom every Wednesday. You can email me for the link or contact details of the club.

bookmark_borderTuesday, week 8 (Oct. 13)

Today is Tuesday of week 8, October 13.

I don't have much to mention at the top right now, I just want to draw your attention to this useful resource: a series of short video lectures from Prof. Mullaney on Youtube. His production runs a bit behind on the schedule of the Modern China and the CUE course, but it may be useful as you're reviewing materials to gear up for a larger project or just if you're curious about Chinese history, so check out his Youtube playlist on modern China.

The quality of production is much better than anything you'd get from me, and he's a really good historian, so I have no hesitation recommending his videos. I also enjoyed reading his book, The Chinese Typewriter, about the history of -- you guessed it!-- a Chinese typewriter.

Schedule for today

Drop-in tutorials

Drop in tutorial: 2-3 pm, open to all.

  • Option 1: reserve a spot on this Google appointment page
  • Option 2: "drop in" anytime, but you may have to wait a bit in the waiting room.

Both are for a Zoom meeting, using the Green Link on your respective Canvas SECRETS pages (or find the info in your Canvas Calendar).

HST137
  • Add your comments for your colleagues' Week 7 Reflection posts on textiles, using Hypothes.is by tonight, 11.59pm.
  • Your Initial Post for Week 8 is due at 11.59pm tonight. Don't forget to add an image!
  • Remember to collect your points in the Canvas declaration quizzes for both these tasks.
HST271
HST439

Event: The 2020 Elections: The Politics of a Divided America.

7 pm: live webinar, find links and details on the website

Dr. Chris Borick will host a live webinar with G. Terry Madonna, Director of the Franklin & Marshall College Poll. From the organizers of the event: "Terry Madonna is a frequent participant in our bi-annual election series programs. He's an expert on elections and polling and always delivers an interesting and insightful presentation."

Tuesday tech-tip: schedule emails and blog posts in advance:

  • If you worry about disturbing your professor (or a friend) in the middle of the night with an email;
  • if you don't want others to know that your most productive time is 3.12am because it's your little secret;
  • if you worry you'll forget to publish your post by the deadline, but you're not quiiiiiite ready yet to publish it really:

Then consider the following tricks:

  • Schedule your email in advance in the Google mail website! Click on the little arrow next to the blue "send" button, and pick a time that seems more reasonable.

  • Write your blog post the previous day and schedule one (or a few days) in advance:

    • In the editor window, in the right hand sidebar for the post, under the Document tab, you see "Publish: Immediately".
    • Click on "Immediately", and pick a time that does not give away your secret as a lover of the wee little hours of the night.

bookmark_borderMonday, week 8 (Oct. 12)

Today would have been Fall Break, but it isn't. For HST271, I have made an executive decision to push the due date for the feedback on posts from week 7 to Tuesday, so you can (if you want) pretend it's a bit of a Fall Break day. Yay!

"Herbst / Autumn" by marcostetter is licensed under CC PDM 1.0

 

I don't know if my plan to make this week's reading load a bit lighter actually works out, but rest assured it could have been far heavier: I had a ton more things I wanted to assign and I held myself back.

If you have feedback on the course, remember you can drop me a line anonymously at your course's typepad, look for the link in the "Where to ask questions" section in your course's weekly schedule. I'll send out a little survey soon too, if you're not yet fed up with surveys from all your other courses!

Schedule for today

HST137
  • Feedback on response posts is due on Tuesday, and the Randomizer will go up on this morning.
  • Get started on your Readings for week 8. This week we look at buildings, large or small. Two options, no shared "Basic Set", and more visual than text-heavy in the materials. I hope this is easier to digest this week!
HST271
  • Discussion remarks and feedback on your colleagues' post from last week is due TOMORROW, just for this once (Fall Break optional illusion.
  • There are no exploration packs, and only one chapter and a short primary source text from the Search for Modern China books this week in the Readings for this week, the rest is optional. I hope this gives you a bit of breathing space
HST439
  • Feedback on your colleagues' posts is due on Tuesday and the Randomizer is up and running!
  • Readings are available, and you have one basic set two options to explore a little bit about Western visitors to communist held territory before 1949.

Mules in the spotlight

Matt of HST271 has a hidden talent for social media, it turns out. Give the article a read, it's really interesting:

Maybe our humble little @berghistory account can get some advice from him how to get more followers 😬 Congrats!

Mini-Monday

You haven't seen cute until you've seen this:

Happy Monday!

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